Reports & Articles

Healthier Kids Foundation values the importance of sharing information with others. We invite you to read the following reports and articles:

San Jose drinking water to receive flouride, years behind other Bay Area cities

Mercury News, Paul Rogers – December 2016

School Success Means Catching Vision Problems Early – May 2014

California Health Report – May 2014

Policy Briefs by Mathematica Policy Research, Inc.

  1. Issue Brief Number 2 – May 2008
    This brief presents highlights from rigorous, independent evaluations of the Healthy Kids programs in three California counties, Los Angeles, San Mateo, and Santa Clara. Launched by Children’s Health Initiatives (CHIs) in these counties between 2001 and 2003, the three Healthy Kids programs provide children with comprehensive health insurance coverage, including a broad range of medical and dental care, prescription drugs, and mental health services. Children are eligible for Healthy Kids if they are ineligible for California’s two major state insurance programs, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families, and live in families with incomes up to 300 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) in Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties, and 400 percent of the FPL in San Mateo County. Most of the children enrolled in Healthy Kids have family incomes at or below the poverty level. This brief describes some of the many positive impacts that Healthy Kids programs have had on children, including improvements in their access to and use of medical services and reductions in their unmet need for care.
  2. Issue Brief Number 1 – November 2007
    This brief presents highlights from rigorous, independent evaluations of the Healthy Kids programs in three California counties, Los Angeles, San Mateo, and Santa Clara. Launched by Children’s Health Initiatives (CHIs) in these counties between 2001 and 2003, the three Healthy Kids programs provide children with comprehensive health insurance coverage, including a broad range of medical and dental care, prescription drugs, and mental health services. Children are eligible for Healthy Kids if they are ineligible for California’s two major state insurance programs, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families, and live in families with incomes up to 300 percent of the federal poverty level (FPL) in Los Angeles and Santa Clara counties, and 400 percent of the FPL in San Mateo County. Most of the children enrolled in Healthy Kids have family incomes at or below the poverty level. This brief describes some of the many positive impacts that Healthy Kids programs have had on children, including improvements in their access to and use of medical services and reductions in their unmet need for care.
  3. Issue Brief Number 5 – June 2007
    Launched in January 2001 by the Santa Clara County Children’s Health Initiative (CHI), the Healthy Kids program provides health insurance coverage to over 13,000 children in the county with household incomes up to 300 percent of the federal poverty level ($62,000 for a family of four) who are ineligible for the two major state insurance programs in California, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. The vast majority of Healthy Kids children have household incomes below 250 percent of the federal poverty level, low enough to qualify them for one of the state programs, but they are ineligible for these programs because of their immigration status. This brief presents findings from two surveys of families with incomes below 250 percent of the federal poverty level with a child enrolled in Healthy Kids. Families were first surveyed after their child had been enrolled for about one year. They were surveyed again after their child had been enrolled for about four years. The brief describes changes in children’s medical care and other outcomes between these two surveys—that is, during the most recent three years that they had stable Healthy Kids coverage.
  4. Issue Brief Number 4 – March 2007
    This brief presents findings from a survey of families with children who are enrolled in the Healthy Kids program in Santa Clara County, California. Launched in January 2001 by the Santa Clara County Children’s Health Initiative (CHI), Healthy Kids provides health insurance coverage to children in the county with household incomes up to 300 percent of the federal poverty level ($62,000 for a family of four) who are ineligible for the two major state insurance programs, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. The vast majority of Healthy Kids children have household incomes below 250 percent of the federal poverty level, low enough to qualify them for one of the state programs, but they are ineligible for these programs because of their immigration status. This brief describes the impact of Healthy Kids on children’s health status, including perceived health, functional limitations, and school days missed because of health problems.
  5. Issue Brief Number 2 – April 2005
    This brief presents findings from a survey of families with children enrolled in the Healthy Kids program in Santa Clara County, California. Launched in January 2001 by the Santa Clara County Children’s Health Initiative (CHI), Healthy Kids provides health insurance coverage to children in the county with household income below 300 percent of the federal poverty level ($58,050 for a family of four) who are ineligible for the two major state insurance programs, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. The vast majority of Healthy Kids enrollees are in households with income below 250 percent of the federal poverty level, low enough to qualify them for one of the state programs. However, they are ineligible for the state programs because of their immigration status. This brief provides a profile of these children and information on the impact of Healthy Kids on their medical and dental care.
  6. Issue Brief Number 3 – June 2004
    This brief is based on Mathematica’s evaluation of the Santa Clara County Children’s Health Initiative (CHI), an ambitious effort launched in January 2001 to extend health coverage to all uninsured children in Santa Clara County, California. A coalition of community organizations, county agencies, and the local Medicaid health plan developed the initiative to improve the health and well-being of low-income children in the county. CHI has two parts; the first is a new insurance product, Healthy Kids, which covers children with incomes up to 300 percent of the federal poverty level who are ineligible for the two major state insurance programs, Medi-Cal and Healthy Families. Current enrollment in Healthy Kids is about 13,000. The second part of CHI—a comprehensive outreach campaign built on the message that all children under 300 percent of poverty are eligible for coverage—finds uninsured children and enrolls them in the public program for which they are eligible.
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